Skip to content

HSUS Targets Children with PETA-Style Propaganda



reprinted from Humanewatch.org

Before we launched this website regarding the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), we exposed the tactics and agenda of another animal liberation group:People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA). There’s a lot in common between PETA and HSUS in terms of their goals, though the tactics often differ. PETA sends half-naked women out in the cold, while HSUS activists wear suits.

One particularly disturbing PETA tactic is targeting kids. Last Thanksgiving, PETA created an ad that, when viewed by those of a child’s height, showed a bloody image of a mom killing a turkey. This is nothing new. Our report “Your Kids, PETA’s Pawns” documents the variety of intolerable ways that PETA targets children.

HSUS also targets kids. The organization has long produced a magazine called “KIND News,” which it ships to classrooms. And now it is expanding its child-targeted propaganda by issuing a “public service announcement” to schools across the country.

HSUS wants to promote “Meatless Monday,” a campaign started about 10 years ago with funding from a wealthy New York socialite with ties to animal-rights campaigns. HSUS, of course, wants people to go meatless every day of the week—as well as cheese-less, milk-less, ice cream-less, butter-less, and so on. But asking for one day is a “softer” ask.

From what we’ve seen, “Meatless Monday” has had a number of people or organizations say they’ll take part—but then have (with much less fanfare) given it up. The Animal Ag Alliance called up 155 colleges and universities listed as pledges, and 43% either stopped participating or never did in the first place.

Meatless Monday is the animal liberation movement’s sneak attack on bacon. Its premises and arguments are shoddy. And now, the movement is targeting impressionable kids who may not be savvy enough to know how to look up all the facts. In expanding its campaign targeting children, HSUS has chosen the low road.

More Stories