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Jerry Harris Responds to Dr. Behre



Editors Note: The following was sent to us by Jerry Harris responding to a post made by Dr. Behre on the WHR message board.

As always Dr Behre pays no attention to the facts and writes what he wants to write. First I don't recall him being in Perry at all and no matter what he says he, I and all of you know he knows very little about the Walking
Horse. He also knows that he changes the inspection to suit his self and what he wants the public to believe about this industry. He gives out false information as fact when the truth will not do it for him. I can not put much store in a man that can not be trusted or does not tell the truth at all times. Ask him some time why court was a journed when the prosecutor
asked him how he could remember so much about a horse and Dr Behre replied "I saw the tape".

As for the Celebration and me videoing the inspections live. I was all forit but was not allowed to. Maybe if I had, everyone would know how far DrBehre and whoever was on the other end of the cell phone call would go toharm this industry.

I would love to interview Dr Behre, Dr Gipson and even the CEO of the Humane Society at any time. I have some questions I'd like to ask them, so every one can hear what the truth is.

He said the USDA personnel do not write tickets! Well then from now on Lonnie should tell all his DQP inspectors that when they pass a horse and the USDA says he gets a ticket let the USDA write the ticket if one is written. I don't understand how a person that can not keep a job in the regular work force can go to work for the USDA and be called an expert in this industry. I mean statements like Walking Horses don't grow warts on their feet and they sweat more than other horses. Give me a break.

I have showed where they keep a horse in inspection for up to 20 minutes and his answer to that is the USDA was not checking the horse that long. Well no they were not but they were the ones who called the horse back and kept sending both VMO and DQP personnel over to check the horse, so as the supervisor of the inspection they had control. The DQP checks the horse and it passes or it doesn', but when they check a horse it takes forever and then you get the ultimatum of take this or I'll get you for this. We all know what this is called.

I for one believe that if we had USDA Inspectors that knew more about the horse we would not have near the problem we have, after all from what I have heard the independent Vets at the Celebration had different opinions on the horses given tickets and they make their living working on horses in the work force which should tell every one something.

It is the same in all industries, if you take someone that is unable to keep a job in the work force and put him or her in a position of power they will show every time just how big a fool they can make of their self.

I'll make a bet with Dr Behre any time and show that I'm right. I'll put together 20 head of horses put them in stalls and let him and his "Expert Personnel" check the horses without ever talking with each other and when they are done their findings will not match at all. Now to me this is fair to both sides. He claims the inspectors are like a fine tuned team much like a Race Car pit crew and people marvel at how efficient they are. Heres achance to prove it.

Dr Behre and Dr Gipson both agreed that if the TWH was in the same shape when the HPA was passed it never would have been passed. We are setting 99% so give us credit and let the world know where we are. Let them know that we do more than any other breed to protect our horse. Is it that hard to tell the truth? We know we are not at 100% and never will be as long as humans are in the industry. After all I don't know of any type industry that 100%.

Give credit where it is due and stop changing the rules to suit you.

Jerry W. Harris

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