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Tennessee Owners See New Look On Coggins



NASHVILLE, Tenn. – As most horse owners know, you must have a bright yellow form as proof of a negative Coggins test in order to participate in shows, sales, trail rides or similar events where equine are gathered. Starting this month, however, those bright yellow forms will have a new look in Tennessee. 

The Tennessee Department of Agriculture has begun using a perforated mark on the bottom of the distinctive yellow forms. The forms are required as proof that horses and other equine have tested negative for Equine Infectious Anemia, otherwise known as a Coggins test. 

“With the new perforated mark of approval, we hope to serve Tennessee’s horse community better by making the official Coggins test form easier to identify,” said State Veterinarian Charles Hatcher. “We want fair, show and sale operators and other event organizers to be aware of the new look and to recognize that it meets state animal health requirements for EIA testing.”

Rather than a standard signature, the new form will have a series of small holes punched at the bottom to authenticate the certificate. The punched holes will spell out “KORD ADDL” for the department’s Kord Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory, the test date and “NEG” for negative. The new method of showing proof will help reduce chances of fraud, reduce laboratory processing and ultimately save the state money.   

The new look of the Coggins test form does not change the requirement that horse owners show proof of a negative test within six of months of selling a horse or when horses of different owners are commingled. 

EIA is a viral disease of horses that is transmitted through insect bites. Once infected, a horse remains infected throughout its lifetime and can serve as a reservoir for transmission to other horses. Through disease testing and surveillance, Tennessee normally experiences a low incidence of EIA each year. For more information on EIA or the new Coggins test form visit www.TN.gov/agriculture or call the State Veterinarian’s office at 615-837-5120.  

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