Skip to content

Why is HSUS against Bills that Fight Animal Cruelty



More and more states are considering proposals that would require reporting of animal cruelty that is videotaped or otherwise documented to law enforcement within 48 hours. The idea is to stop animal cruelty faster, yet the Humane Society of the United States and other vegan animal liberation groups are hysterical, running around and acting as if the sky is falling.

Let’s clear up some of the misinformation being thrown around.

1. Myth: The bills will harm free speech. There is nothing prohibiting activists from telling the media what they document. There is no “gag,” simply a duty to report findings to authorities. That’s similar to how it’s against the law in some areas to fail to report a crime.

2. Myth: The bills are a desperate attempt to cover up bad acts. Gee, well, the bills require law enforcement to be notified of possible animal abuse, so that seems to be a rather poor cover-up scheme. And the videos could be used as evidence in open court. It’s not as if once a case goes to court that the media can’t cover all the details. Just look at the Jodi Arias trial.

3. Myth: The proposals will harm whistleblowers. Whistleblowers are protected as long as they report any apparent crimes to authorities within 48 hours. This means activists can still film undercover, they just have a duty to report.

4. Myth: The bills are written by the conservative think tank American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). One California paper’s editorial claimed a state bill copies ALEC model legislation. It doesn’t. That model legislation, first proposed in 2003 and called the “Animal and Ecological Terrorism Act,” is actually similar to a federalAnimal Enterprise Terrorism Act that Congress passed in 2006. That’s an important piece of legislation in its own right to battle terroristic elements in the animal rights movement, but we’ll save that discussion for another day. (HSUS, by the way, also opposed this anti-terrorism law.)

Let’s repeat: Animal cruelty can still be covertly documented under these mandatory reporting proposals. The documentation just has to be reported to authorities. That’s hardly onerous or nefarious.
Remember, animal rights activists are not law enforcement and are not impartial. They have their own agendas, and the decision about how to proceed if they do find animal abuse should not be up to them. It should be law enforcement’s call.

Why would this bother animal rights groups? Because it means they can’t just sit around with the cameras rolling for months while animals are abused so that they can, say, splice together footage and concoct a (false) narrative, to say nothing of fundraising opportunities. Shouldn’t stopping animal cruelty be the one and only priority? You would hope so.

The primary issue here is stopping animal cruelty faster. Let’s not lose sight of that. And let’s hope the public doesn’t either despite the noise and propaganda from the Humane Society of the United States and its allies.

reprinted from Humanewatch.org

More Stories

  • Equine Obituary – Watch It Now

    It is with great sadness that we announce the loss of Watch It Now due to complications from colic... Read More
  • South Central Kentucky Walking Horse Association cancels banquet

    The South Central Kentucky Walking Horse Association has canceled their annual banquet for 2021. The association hopes to host their banquet in 2022. For more information, contact Frankie Jo Bradley at 270-6460-7957. Read More
  • APHIS posts 2020 enforcement activity summary

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has posted their fiscal year 2020 enforcement activity summary... Read More
  • Museum to receive 1946 copy of Blue Ribbon magazine

    The Walking Horse Report recently received a copy of a 1946 Blue Ribbon magazine.  The copy was sent by a Report subscriber Robert Smith in Elma, Wash... Read More
  • NAS makes recommendations regarding inspections

    The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine (NAS) released their report, “A Review of Methods for Detecting Soreness in Horses,” earlier today. The committee has been working on the report for over a year with their first meeting happening in October 2019... Read More
  • USDA to host virtual training for HIOs

    The United States Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services has informed the industry’s Horse Industry Organizations that it will host a virtual training this year due to ongoing conditions surrounding the Covid-19 pandemic.  Read More
  • Kentucky HIO makes plans for 2021

    The Kentucky HIO recently announced updates for the 2021 show season. The HIO will lower horse show affiliation fee to $50 and maintain the $6 inspection fee per horse this year... Read More
  • Get the news…FAST

    It has been a year! The Walking Horse Industry remains strong and our supporters continue to dedicate their time and efforts to ensuring our future. Sales have seen record-high numbers and barns continue to bustle with the talk of the “next great one.”  Read More
  • WHTA seeks new office manager

    The Walking Horse Trainers’ Association (WHTA) has posted an opening for its office manager position. The WHTA will begin taking applications immediately.  Interested applicants should send their resume to the WHTA at PO Box 61, Shelbyville, Tenn. 37162. Read More
  • Obituary – Dr. Gordon DePoyster

    The Report has recently learned of the passing of Dr. Gordon DePoyster on January 12, 2021. He is the husband ofLaMar DePoyster of Greenville, Kentucky... Read More